Imitations from a Romanian Hoard 9
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M351+. Various obverse prototypes, reverse type of C. Postumius, after 74 BC; cf. Cr-394/1 (O), 3.56g. Obverse stylized, reverse "barbarous"; no obverse legend other than X; blundered, perhaps barely recognizable reverse legend.
M352+. Obverse type of Gar, Ogvl, Ver, reverse type of C. Postumius, after 74 BC; cf. Cr-350A/ (O) and 394/1 (R), 4.41g. Both sides stylized; no obverse legend; blundered, meaningless reverse legend. See M267 for another example of this obverse die.
H10+. Obverse type of C. or M. Aburius Geminus, reverse type of Q. Fufius Calenus & Mucius Cordius, after 70 BC; cf. Cr-244/1 or 250/1 (O) and 403/1 (R), 3.75g. Obverse stylized, with blundered, recognizable legend; reverse mechanically transferred from official coin.
M353+. Types of C. Piso Frugi, after 67 BC; cf. Cr-408/1, 3.92g. Both sides stylized; no obverse legend; blundered, meaningless reverse legend. See next coin for another example of this reverse die.
M354+. Various obverse prototypes, reverse type of C. Piso Frugi, after 67 BC; cf. Cr-408/1 (R), 3.79g. Both sides stylized; no obverse legend; blundered, meaningless reverse legend. See preceding coin for another example of this reverse die.
M355+. Obverse type of Faustus Cornelius Sulla, various reverse prototypes, after 56 BC; cf. Cr-426/1 (O), 3.17g. Both sides stylized, reverse much more so; no obverse legend; blundered, meaningless reverse legend.
M356+. Obverse type of L. & C. (or L.) Memmius Galerius, reverse type of P. Fonteius Capito, after 55 BC; cf. Cr-349/1 or 313/1 (O) and Cr-429/1 (R), 3.43g. Both sides stylized, in very vigorous style; blundered, meaningless obverse legend; blundered, perhaps barely recognizable reverse legend. A dramatic and baffling coin, really a new creation. The proposed prototypes do not explain the obverse legend or the reverse tongs and exurgal line.
CT2+. Types of M. Cato, after 47 BC; cf. Cr-462/1c, 3.73g. Struck, in some atypical manner, from dies mechanically transferred from official coin. This coin was also included with the other imitations from the Romanian Hoard, and on balance, I accept that designation. The very soft obverse is typical of a transfer die, and the thick flan with "beveled" edges differs from the official coins of this issue. Those coins were struck in Africa though, under difficult civil war conditions, and again I remain open to the possibility that this is indeed an official Roman coin.
Ne19+. Various prototypes, after 144 BC; earliest quadriga cf. Cr-221/1, 3.82g. Both sides stylized; "quadriga" with three horses; blundered, meaningless legends.
Ne20+. Various obverse prototypes, reverse type of Lucius Appuleius Saturninus, after 104 BC; cf. Cr-317/3b (R), 3.39g. Remarkable obverse, Roma with mouth wide open, resembling nothing so much as the archaic silver pieces of Miletus (surely a coincidence!); otherwise, both sides somewhat stylized, with blundered, meaningless legends.
Ne21+. Obverse type of C. Claudius Pulcher (?), reverse type of Q. Antonius Balbus, after 83 BC; cf. Cr-300/1 (O?) and 364/1 (R), 3.41g. Both sides somewhat stylized; no obverse legend; blundered, recognizable reverse legend.
Plated Imitations
The following three coins were included in the group of imitations from this hoard, but were not identified as fourrees. Certainly, they aren't official products of a Roman mint, but neither do I consider them likely to be Dacian. In general, I view all plated denarii as contemporary counterfeits, most likely produced within the borders of the empire. If that's correct, they would have traveled to Dacia unnoticed among the thousands of official coins in this hoard.